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Tri-Mach Goes RED

June 8, 2018

Today, Tri-Mach Group wears RED to show support and participate in RED Day.

What is RED Day?

St. Mary’s Red DAY fundraiser is an opportunity to come together as a community to raise awareness of heart disease as a serious health risk and how it can be prevented. According to the Regional Cardiac Centre, heart disease is the leading cause of death among Canadian women. Every year, heart disease claims the lives of roughly 25,000 women. This is more than the five most prevalent cancers combined. Tri-Mach Group is proud to be part of the RED Day community and is thrilled in the increased RED Day investment for the St. Mary’s Regional Cardiac Care Centre.

Show your support today and wear RED for the heart of the women you love! #RedDayFriday

For more information on RED Day or to donate to this cause, go to: www.supportstmarys.akaraisin.com

New Brunswick Oyster Processor is Expanding

From: Food in Canada

Neguac, N.B. – An oyster processor is investing in new technology – thanks to help from the federal and provincial governments.

In a statement, New Brunswick’s Department of Agriculture, Aquaculture and Fisheries, says La Maison BeauSoleil will use almost $800,000 to install technology that will clean and package fresh oysters.

The federal government is contributing $500,000 and the province is investing almost $300,000 through the Northern New Brunswick Economic Development and Innovation Fund.

The new technology will also help the company “increase processing capacity to meet the anticipated expansion of the industry, maximize the economic value of the product and create a better working environment for employees and more efficient operations.”

Pat Finnigan, MP for Miramichi-Grand Lake, says in the statement that La Maison BeauSoleil is expanding its market and becoming known for its “clean, sustainable production of cultured oysters.”

Finnigan goes on to say that the government support, which is through the Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency, “is helping [La Maison] upgrade its operations and introduce new technology and automated processes to meet rapidly growing domestic and international demand, while also creating jobs.”

Currently, the company has 30 staff, and purchases from dozens of suppliers. Its oysters are sold in Canada, the U.S., and also into China. The company is looking at expanding into Europe and the Middle East. The statement says the federal government is also contributing $60,000 so the company can hire a marketing consultant who specializes in Asian markets “to develop a marketing plan aimed at increasing the company’s exports to China and Hong Kong.”

 

Conestoga College Job Fair 2018

March 22, 2018

On March 21st, Conestoga College held their annual Job Fair in the Cambridge Campus Atrium. This event gives students the opportunity to network with a variety of different employers who are actively recruiting for full-time, co-op and summer positions for trades and apprenticeships. As one of the employers invited, Tri-Mach Group of Companies met with many enthusiastic students who brought forward insightful questions about our group of companies and millwrighting as a career.

On behalf of the Tri-Mach Group of Companies, we would like to take this opportunity to thank @ConestogaCollege for inviting us to attend as well as all of the students that participated in this highly successful event. Thank you to those who stopped by our booth – Tri-Mach Group of Companies would like to wish the best of luck to all of the future millwrights, welders and fabricators who apply for positions.

Visit www.conestogac.on.ca for more information about their programs and courses. 

We’re hiring!

Tri-Mach Group and Advance Millwrights are currently seeking passionate individuals for full-time licensed millwright positions. Individuals that are interested are invited to apply to resumes@tri-mach.com

Canada’s CFIA and USA’s FDA Have Signed a Memorandum of Understanding

From: Food in Canada

College Park, Md. – The Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) have agreed to collaborate.

The two agencies announced in a press release that they “have signed a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) that will facilitate the sharing of food safety information and data, and enable collaborative research projects.”

For a look at the MOU, click here.

Paul Mayers, vice-president of the Science Branch of the CFIA, says in the statement that the two countries already share a strong tie, which “allows us to work together to find innovative and cooperative ways to share information and data in respect to food safety. This collaborative approach to information sharing builds on our individual strengths while expanding our combined knowledge.”

The purpose of the MOU, which was signed at the FDA Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition campus, is to help both countries collaborate on food safety science.

The MOU is expected to give scientists on both sides of the border access to greater food safety information and data, which will bolster innovation and advance research.

PEI Students Help Fix Oyster Industry Problem

From: Food in Canada

Charlottetown, PEI – Students at the University of Prince Edward Island have developed a piece of equipment that will make oyster growing a whole lot less labour intensive.

In a story on the university’s website (“SSDE students flip oyster problem into a business opportunity,” on Oct. 4, 2017), UPEI explains that “farmed oysters, which are grown in cages weighing up to 200 pounds each, need to be turned once to twice per week during the growing months for an average of five years.”

Some farms may have anywhere from 200 cages to thousands of them. So growers look for employees strong enough to handle the job for up to 10 hours per day, says the story. The job of cage turning helps to “discourage mussels, barnacles and algae build-up, which lets water circulate better and more food reach the oysters. This results in more appealing oysters that can garner higher prices.”

The students in the School of Sustainable Design and Engineering (SSDE) at UPEI developed “specially designed equipment that gently guides the oyster cage in a roller coaster-like flip,” says UPEI. The students are Jordan Sampson, Brett McDermott and Dylan MacIssac.

According to UPEI, the industry has welcomed the news of the invention. It removed the “back-breaking labour” from the job; saves time and money; and will help address staff shortages.

An independent PEI-based company, Synapse Inc., has stepped up to help the students turn their invention into a marketable product. The company helps transfer expertise and knowledge from the UPEI into products, services, and insights that offer benefits beyond the university.

The students have filed for patent, start-up funds and will soon incorporate their company.

Canada’s Outdoor Farm Show 2017

From: Canada’s Outdoor Farm Show 

Now in its 24th year, Canada’s Outdoor Farm Show features 750 exhibitors showcasing the latest in agricultural science, technology and innovation through interactive displays, demonstrations and exhibits.  As a business-to-business show dedicated solely to agricultural products, Canada’s Outdoor Farm Show delivers agricultural advancements that will help Canadian farmers continue to produce high-quality and safe food competitively. 

The Outdoor Farm Show is running from September 12-14 from 8:30 am to 5:00 pm at Canada’s Outdoor Park in Woodstock, Ontario. 

Make sure you come visit Tri-Mach Group of Companies at the Outdoor Farm Show this year. We are located at the ACMPR Exhibit in booth C4. Found out what’s new in custom machining, robotic automation and sanitary equipment design from Tri-Mach Group Inc. and Advance Millwrights Inc. 

For more information on the Farm Show or to view the exhibitor map, go to: www.outdoorfarmshow.com

IFPT/Conestoga Offers a New Program Targeted to Food Manufacturing Leaders

From: BLOCKtalk Magazine 

In the fall of 2016, Conestoga College, through the Craig Richardson Institute of Food Processing Technology (IFPT), launched a new graduate certificate program called, “Operations Leadership in Food Manufacturing”. This one-year, full-time program at Conestoga College is designed for students who want to be prepared for an advanced supervisory career in the food manufacturing industry.

Tri-Mach Group, in partnership with Conestoga, built and installed three full processing lines for the IFPT facility in 2012. These processing lines included: a Vegetable line, a Baking line, and a Liquid Processing line. Tri-Mach Group is happy to hear that the IFPT facility is becoming a success in training graduate students in: quality, food safety, maintenance, operations, procurement, and planning.

Click here to find out the best practices and tools that students are learning from this new and innovative program at Conestoga College.

P.E.I. government invests in province’s lobster holding capacity

From The Guardian

There will be more space available in P.E.I. to store live lobsters so they are as fresh as possible when they are processed and sent around the world.

Innovation P.E.I. has contributed more than $224,000 in grants to the Live Lobster Holding Program since it began in March 2015, with the remaining $2.2 million coming from the private sector. The expansions are being made to holding facilities in Evangeline, Acadian Supreme Inc.; Souris, Colville Bay Oyster Co. Ltd.; Tignish, Royal Star Foods Ltd.; Summerside, JMK Fish Mart Co.; and Darnley, Basin View Seafood Inc.

The projects will add more than a half-a-million pounds to the province’s total lobster holding capacity, which is approximately 2.3 million pounds. Being able to hold live lobster for a longer period gives processors more flexibility to adjust their production to meet existing labour supply.

Read the full article here.

Amazon is going to sell its own line of food

From ReCode

Amazon is going to start selling its own brands of snacks, diapers and detergent — a move lots of traditional retailers have already made. But Amazon isn’t a traditional retailer, so this move could be very meaningful for Amazon and its competitors.

The e-commerce powerhouse will soon begin selling its own packaged goods exclusively to Amazon Prime members under brands like Happy Belly and Mama Bear, the Wall Street Journal reports. Recode reported in February that Amazon was testing out the Mama Bear brand name.

Amazon already sells things like electronic accessories, office supplies and even clothing under a variety of its own brand names. Now it’s going all in on groceries and household products.

While some people will point out that so-called “private labeling” is nothing new — grocery stores and big-box retailers have been increasingly pushing their in-house brands — this is a much bigger deal. That’s because the growth in retail is all going to be online, and Amazon owns online. It already accounts for half of all sales growth in U.S. e-commerce.

Read the full article here.

This groundbreaking technology will soon let us see exactly what’s in our food

From the Washington Post

Imagine a scanner the size of a grain of rice, built into your phone. You go to the grocery store and point it at something you want to buy. If it’s an apple, the scanner will tell you what variety it is, how much vitamin C it has and how long it has been in cold storage. If it’s a fish, you’ll learn whether it’s really orange roughy or just tilapia being passed off as something more expensive. If it’s a muffin, the device will tell you whether there’s gluten in it.

Although you won’t be able to do it tomorrow, this isn’t some kind of distant Jetsonian vision of the future. I’ve held the rice-size scanner in my hand; it was built for only a few dollars. I’ve seen bigger, more robust versions of the scanner do the things that your smartphone will be able to do, probably during the administration of the president we’re deciding on right now.

Every substance reflects (and absorbs) light in a different way, and the graph of that reflected light is a kind of optical fingerprint. Except it’s better. Although the whorls and lines in our fingertips don’t say anything inherent about their owner (See that swirl? Doesn’t mean you’re smart.), the peaks and valleys of the optical fingerprint do. That peak there is vitamin C. That other one is sugar. This pattern means gluten.

Identifying a food and its characteristics based on the scan is a twofold job: First, you simply match the optical reading to a library of known objects; second, you read the topography of the graph to zero in on specific characteristics. The two together can tell you an awful lot about what you’re scanning.

Read the full article here.