23 Donway Court, Elmira, ON | 1-877-TRI-MACH

The Digitalization of Food Palletizing

From: Food Manufacturing

The technological and social revolutions of the past few decades have completely reshaped industry. The food packaging and palletizing industry is no exception. In fact, the last ten years alone has seen the adoption of advanced technologies at an unprecedented rate. Alan Spreckley, robotics food and beverage segment manager, and palletizing robotics expert at ABB, explains how digitalization is repackaging the future of food palletizing.

Spreckly explains that this growing trend places a higher demand for single-portion servings of pre-prepared and pre-packaged food on the food industry, which makes the packaging and palletizing processes less linear than they have previously been. Similarly, the unstable economy of recent years has nurtured a generation of savvy customers, eager for the special offers and deals that retailers regularly provide, further complicating the palletizing process. This leads to scenarios where manufacturers will be required to change palletizing patterns quickly and cost-efficiently.

Robotics is taking over the palletizing industry. In the past decade, robot pricing has come down making this a cost-effective choice for palletizing applications. Robots are more flexible and require less maintenance and floor space. Our sister company (Advance Millwrights Inc.), provides equipment for bag filling/handling, bag sealing and robotic palletizing.

Go to www.advancemillwrights.com for more information on robotic palletizing.

Canada’s Outdoor Farm Show 2017

From: Canada’s Outdoor Farm Show 

Now in its 24th year, Canada’s Outdoor Farm Show features 750 exhibitors showcasing the latest in agricultural science, technology and innovation through interactive displays, demonstrations and exhibits.  As a business-to-business show dedicated solely to agricultural products, Canada’s Outdoor Farm Show delivers agricultural advancements that will help Canadian farmers continue to produce high-quality and safe food competitively. 

The Outdoor Farm Show is running from September 12-14 from 8:30 am to 5:00 pm at Canada’s Outdoor Park in Woodstock, Ontario. 

Make sure you come visit Tri-Mach Group of Companies at the Outdoor Farm Show this year. We are located at the ACMPR Exhibit in booth C4. Found out what’s new in custom machining, robotic automation and sanitary equipment design from Tri-Mach Group Inc. and Advance Millwrights Inc. 

For more information on the Farm Show or to view the exhibitor map, go to: www.outdoorfarmshow.com

IFPT/Conestoga Offers a New Program Targeted to Food Manufacturing Leaders

From: BLOCKtalk Magazine 

In the fall of 2016, Conestoga College, through the Craig Richardson Institute of Food Processing Technology (IFPT), launched a new graduate certificate program called, “Operations Leadership in Food Manufacturing”. This one-year, full-time program at Conestoga College is designed for students who want to be prepared for an advanced supervisory career in the food manufacturing industry.

Tri-Mach Group, in partnership with Conestoga, built and installed three full processing lines for the IFPT facility in 2012. These processing lines included: a Vegetable line, a Baking line, and a Liquid Processing line. Tri-Mach Group is happy to hear that the IFPT facility is becoming a success in training graduate students in: quality, food safety, maintenance, operations, procurement, and planning.

Click here to find out the best practices and tools that students are learning from this new and innovative program at Conestoga College.

Wood-derived ingredients could be future of food, researchers say

From FoodBev.com

Manufacturers could soon be using wood-derived polymers such as xylan, fibrillated cellulose and lignin to improve the texture and reduce the energy content of food products, according to Finland’s VTT Technical Research Centre. The Espoo-based organisation said that the wood-derived ingredients could be used in yogurts, baked goods such as cakes and muffins, and meat products.

As the food industry searches for new natural ingredients that improve the quality of products and promote consumer health, its research has shown that the polymers have properties that make them stand out from their traditional counterparts.

Xylan, a hemicellulose extracted from birch pulp, could be used as texture enhancer in yogurt: VTT’s studies shown that xylan can improve the smoothness of yogurt and enhance its stability when compared to conventional manufacturing techniques.

Fibrillated cellulose, which is produced by wet-grinding cellulose fibres, forms a web-like gel that could be utilised as a thickening and stabilising agent for fermented dairy products – yogurt included. It may also reduce cholesterol in the human body.

VTT tested lignin in the manufacture of muffins and found that, in addition to giving muffins a fluffier texture, lignin proved to be a surprisingly efficient substitute for whole eggs and egg yolks. Lignin also functioned as an emulsifier in mayonnaise and contributed to juiciness in a meat product, VTT said.

Read the full article here.

Amazon is going to sell its own line of food

From ReCode

Amazon is going to start selling its own brands of snacks, diapers and detergent — a move lots of traditional retailers have already made. But Amazon isn’t a traditional retailer, so this move could be very meaningful for Amazon and its competitors.

The e-commerce powerhouse will soon begin selling its own packaged goods exclusively to Amazon Prime members under brands like Happy Belly and Mama Bear, the Wall Street Journal reports. Recode reported in February that Amazon was testing out the Mama Bear brand name.

Amazon already sells things like electronic accessories, office supplies and even clothing under a variety of its own brand names. Now it’s going all in on groceries and household products.

While some people will point out that so-called “private labeling” is nothing new — grocery stores and big-box retailers have been increasingly pushing their in-house brands — this is a much bigger deal. That’s because the growth in retail is all going to be online, and Amazon owns online. It already accounts for half of all sales growth in U.S. e-commerce.

Read the full article here.

Five trends impacting upon the dairy industry in 2016

From FoodBev

Natasha Case, CEO and Co-Founder of Coolhaus, has identified five trends that she foresees impacting the dairy industry in 2016.

  • Dairy snacks – the snack market is growing and the dairy industry should focus on strengthening its position here. Consumers want to see more healthy, but substantial, dairy products for when they are on the go
  • Fancy junk food – consumers want to enjoy junk food in a cleaner, elevated fashion. A perfect example of this is fried chicken and waffles (one of our best selling ice cream flavours) — so many restaurants have taken this comfort dish to the next level
  • Locally sourced – it has been said that locally sourced is the new organic, and we couldn’t agree more
  • Storytelling – this goes hand-in-hand with the locally sourced trend. People want to know where their products are coming from and how they are made. They want information that’s presented in a clear and digestible (pun intended) way, whether that be through packaging or social media
  • Full-fat – consumers are looking to introduce more healthy fats into their diets. Buttered coffee is very popular right now, and this full-fat trend will carry over for other dairy products, like yogurt and milk
To learn more about turnkey dairy processing solutions from Tri-Mach Group, click here.
To read the full article, click here.

This groundbreaking technology will soon let us see exactly what’s in our food

From the Washington Post

Imagine a scanner the size of a grain of rice, built into your phone. You go to the grocery store and point it at something you want to buy. If it’s an apple, the scanner will tell you what variety it is, how much vitamin C it has and how long it has been in cold storage. If it’s a fish, you’ll learn whether it’s really orange roughy or just tilapia being passed off as something more expensive. If it’s a muffin, the device will tell you whether there’s gluten in it.

Although you won’t be able to do it tomorrow, this isn’t some kind of distant Jetsonian vision of the future. I’ve held the rice-size scanner in my hand; it was built for only a few dollars. I’ve seen bigger, more robust versions of the scanner do the things that your smartphone will be able to do, probably during the administration of the president we’re deciding on right now.

Every substance reflects (and absorbs) light in a different way, and the graph of that reflected light is a kind of optical fingerprint. Except it’s better. Although the whorls and lines in our fingertips don’t say anything inherent about their owner (See that swirl? Doesn’t mean you’re smart.), the peaks and valleys of the optical fingerprint do. That peak there is vitamin C. That other one is sugar. This pattern means gluten.

Identifying a food and its characteristics based on the scan is a twofold job: First, you simply match the optical reading to a library of known objects; second, you read the topography of the graph to zero in on specific characteristics. The two together can tell you an awful lot about what you’re scanning.

Read the full article here.

Food processors get a kick start with Food Starter

From Food In Canada

With nearly 20,000 new food products introduced to the market each year, consumers have a lot of choice. Each new product represents countless hours of hard work perfecting the product, conducting market research, meeting regulatory requirements and making critical business decisions.

Food Starter is a new venture that provides a launch pad for the discovery, creation and success of new food products and companies in Toronto.

Launched in 2015, Food Starter is a hands-on incubator program for entrepreneurs who want make a breakthrough in the food market. The 20,000 square foot facility provides access to shared production and packaging facilities, business advisory services and a structured training program to help entrepreneurs build and grow their food processing business.

“Food Starter focuses on helping early-stage food processors commercialize and scale the development of their food products so they can become successful in the marketplace and create sustainable jobs,” says Dana McCauley, Food Starter Executive Director. “Our programs bring together all the necessary pieces and people to develop a successful, saleable food.”

McCauley and her team provide clients with customized services including essential business skills, access to commercial and industrial equipment and assistance fielding the regulatory landscape.

Read the full article here.

Parts of Canada, U.S. brand themselves ‘protein highway’

From the Toronto Star

Officials in three Canadian provinces and six northern U.S. states are launching an effort to brand the region as the potential provider of protein to the world. The “Protein Highway” project aims to encourage scientists to work together and share information on protein-rich crops, said Kevin Kephart, South Dakota State University’s vice-president for research and economic development. That could lead to research that would aid farmers and also help entrepreneurs take new food products to market, he said.

Canadian researchers David Gauthier and Larry Sernyk estimate the demand for animal protein will double by 2040 as the world’s population increases. That should result in more demand for high-protein plant products to feed the animals being raised for meat. More people also likely will need to get their protein from plants and fish.

High-protein crops such as lentils, dry beans and dry peas have great potential throughout the “Protein Highway” region, which encompasses Manitoba, Saskatchewan and Alberta north of the border and the Dakotas, Minnesota, Nebraska, Montana and Iowa south of the border, the Canadian researchers said.

To learn more about protein processing solutions from Tri-Mach Group, visit our Meat/Poultry, Bakery, and Snack industry webpages.
Read the full article here.

Report Card on Ontario Food and Beverage Processing Industry Innovation Tells the Story

From Newswire.ca

Food and Beverage Ontario has released two reports on innovation in the Ontario food and beverage processing industry. Reports have indicated that there are several value-creating physical and on-line innovation resources available in Ontario to processor businesses across the province but coordination and communication continue to be key to uptake.

Complementary on-line innovation resources are also available and are largely concerned with information on government programs and funding and advisory services for businesses. Report highlights:

  • Processors cite product innovation as their top innovation priority, however they rank innovation technology and methods as the overall industry priority.
  • The greatest challenge limiting a company’s ability to innovate was identified by over 50 per cent of the respondents as financial resources and time.
  • Companies that seek out external support equally prefer both in-person contact and websites.
  • Processors are asking for innovation resources to be better coordinated, easy to navigate and to access.

“We have been working hard for the last year mapping resources and building a provincial innovation network with key stakeholders,” said Norm Beal, CEO, Food and Beverage Ontario. “Now it’s time for FBO to implement a coordinated plan that will make it easy for Ontario’s 3,000 plus processor businesses to locate exactly the innovation support they need to be more competitive.”

Read the full article here.