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Maple Leaf Foods Buys Organic Poultry Plants

From: Food in Canada

Maple Leaf Foods is purchasing a pair of poultry plants and associated supply from privately-owned Cericola Farms.

The Cericola plants, at Bradford, Ont. and Drummondville, Que., together process about 32 million kg of chicken per year.

Maple Leaf has also entered into an agreement to secure 100 per cent of the processed chicken volume from Cericola’s primary processing plant located in Schomberg, Ont., and holds an option to acquire this asset and associated plant supply in three years.

“Cericola is a leader in raised without antibiotics and organic chicken. This acquisition will build Maple Leaf’s market leadership in these value-added categories and enable us to meet growing consumer demand,” Maple Leaf CEO Michael McCain said in a release.

Cericola Farms’ founder Mary Cericola said the company’s vision over the past 60 years “has been to provide wholesome and natural poultry products to our customers. It is this tradition of excellence that aligns Maple Leaf and Cericola.”

Maple Leaf said the acquisition provides the company with additional supply and value-added processing capability to advance its leadership in higher value categories.

Maple Leaf Foods has transitioned most of its flagship Maple Leaf Prime chicken brand to Prime RWA, where the Canadian market is growing at about 25 per cent annually.

Chicken is the most consumed and fastest growing meat protein segment in North America. Cericola specializes in air-chilled processing of antibiotic-free and animal byproduct-free (“AABF”) and organic poultry products.

The deal is to be financed through a combination of cash-on-hand and drawings under the existing credit facility. The deal is expected to close in August, subject to normal closing requirements including Competition Bureau review.

Tri-Mach Goes RED

June 8, 2018

Today, Tri-Mach Group wears RED to show support and participate in RED Day.

What is RED Day?

St. Mary’s Red DAY fundraiser is an opportunity to come together as a community to raise awareness of heart disease as a serious health risk and how it can be prevented. According to the Regional Cardiac Centre, heart disease is the leading cause of death among Canadian women. Every year, heart disease claims the lives of roughly 25,000 women. This is more than the five most prevalent cancers combined. Tri-Mach Group is proud to be part of the RED Day community and is thrilled in the increased RED Day investment for the St. Mary’s Regional Cardiac Care Centre.

Show your support today and wear RED for the heart of the women you love! #RedDayFriday

For more information on RED Day or to donate to this cause, go to: www.supportstmarys.akaraisin.com

Quebec Meat Companies Look to Expand

From: Food in Canada

Saint-Bruno-Lac-Saint-Jean, Que. – Two businesses in the agri-food sector in Quebec have received repayable loans to help them expand their operations.

In a statement, Canada Economic Development (CED) for Quebec Regions says the two businesses, Boucherie Charcuterie Perron Inc. and Charcuterie L. Fortin Ltée, will share $1,850,000.

That financial support, says CED, “will generate an estimated $6,569,768 in total investments in the Saguenay-Lac-Saint-Jean region.”

Boucherie Charcuterie Perron will receive $1,000,000, and Charcuterie L. Fortin will receive $850,000.

Both companies will use the assistance to “upgrade their equipment and facilities, shifting to Industry 4.0 by automating part of their production,” says the statement.

Boucherie Charcuterie produces hams, sausages, and specialty pork products, while Charcuterie L. Fortin produces deli meats, smoked ham, bacon and specialty pork products.

Both companies are also part of the Nutrinor cooperative and employ nearly 125 people from the region. Nutrinor has 936 farmer members and has a presence in food, agriculture, energy and hardware.

 

Maple Leaf Foods Revamps its Portfolio

From: Food in Canada

Mississauga, Ont. – One of Canada’s largest consumer protein companies is revamping its entire portfolio of products.

In a statement, Maple Leaf Foods says its aim is to meet “the changing needs of Canadian families.”

And in order to do that, the company is now ensuring that all of its products are made with premium meat and real, simple or natural ingredients.

All products will contain no artificial preservatives, flavours, colours or sweeteners. And the company adds that ingredient lists will contain only “pronounceable ingredients that consumers trust.”

The changes are all part of the company’s new Food Manifesto. To read the document, click here.

The products, which began rolling out in May, will have a new logo, packaging design and more prominent ingredient list. Maple Leaf says it will be using television, billboards, digital and print media to get the word out.

Adam Grogan, senior vice-president of Marketing and Innovation, says in the statement that “Over the last 18 months, Maple Leaf has reformulated each product carrying this brand, with just the simplest and highest quality real food.”

Canada’s CFIA and USA’s FDA Have Signed a Memorandum of Understanding

From: Food in Canada

College Park, Md. – The Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) have agreed to collaborate.

The two agencies announced in a press release that they “have signed a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) that will facilitate the sharing of food safety information and data, and enable collaborative research projects.”

For a look at the MOU, click here.

Paul Mayers, vice-president of the Science Branch of the CFIA, says in the statement that the two countries already share a strong tie, which “allows us to work together to find innovative and cooperative ways to share information and data in respect to food safety. This collaborative approach to information sharing builds on our individual strengths while expanding our combined knowledge.”

The purpose of the MOU, which was signed at the FDA Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition campus, is to help both countries collaborate on food safety science.

The MOU is expected to give scientists on both sides of the border access to greater food safety information and data, which will bolster innovation and advance research.

Chicken Deboning Robot Invented

One of the most time-consuming steps involved with poultry processing is bone removal. In order to produce chicken nuggets, patties and other poultry products, the bones must be removed. While there area already machines being used to help strip the meat off the bones, a newly invented “chicken deboning robot” could potentially change the face of the poultry industry.

 

About The Chicken Deboning Robot

Georgia Tech researchers and engineers recently developed a prototype version of a device which uses a 3-D imaging system and cutting arm to debone chicken and poultry products. While it’s still in the early phases of production, the tests ran by the prototype have already proven to be quite successful at separating the chicken from the bones.

Using a machine to remove the bones from a chicken isn’t an entirely new concept. However, the difference with this chicken deboning robot and models previously attempted is the smart 3-D mapping system used. Georgia Tech engineers built this robot to cut each and every chicken differently. As you probably know, chickens come in all different sizes and shapes, so you can’t simply use one type of deboning technique to properly separate every chicken that comes through. The 3-D mapping system takes an image of the bird and then calculates the precise cutting trajectory necessary.

Another unique feature with chicken deboning robot is it’s ability to detect when it hits the bone. Up until now, no other machine has been able to accurately do this. With the ability to detect bone, there’s less chance of it accidentally cutting through and leaving fragments in the poultry.

 

How This Could Change The Poultry Industry

In the state of Georgia alone, poultry is roughly a 20$ billion a year industry. With the current processing methods used, a lot of this poultry is being discarded. If the chicken deboning robot were to successfully hit the shelves, it will reduce the amount of poultry discarded and reduce the possibility of bone fragments making their way into the final product, which in turn will save poultry companies millions of dollars each year.

If engineers and researchers continue to tweak and polish the chick deboning robot, we could potentially see it in manufacturing plants within the next couple of years. Like any piece food manufacturing equipment, there’s still more testing and research to be done, but there’s already a lot of buzz and media coverage surrounding the prototype.