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Premium Brands acquires Ontario protein manufacturer

From: Food in Canada

Vancouver – Premium Brands Holdings Corporation has added a new protein solutions company to its family.

Premium Brands has acquired a 100 per cent interest in Concord Premium Meats, an Ontario company that manufactures products under the MarcAngelo, Skoulakis, Central Park Deli, Black River Angus and Connie’s Kitchen brands.

Premium Brands owns a range of specialty food manufacturing and food distribution businesses with operations in BC, Alberta, Saskatchewan, Manitoba, Ontario, Quebec, Nova Scotia and locations in the U.S.

George Paleologou, president and CEO of Premium Brands, says in a statement that the culture at Concord Premium Meats fits in well at Premium Brands and the company’s “focus on products that are benefitting from a variety of long-term consumer trends, combined with its product innovation abilities and production capacities will help to further accelerate the growth of our Protein Group.”

Tri-Mach Goes RED

June 8, 2018

Today, Tri-Mach Group wears RED to show support and participate in RED Day.

What is RED Day?

St. Mary’s Red DAY fundraiser is an opportunity to come together as a community to raise awareness of heart disease as a serious health risk and how it can be prevented. According to the Regional Cardiac Centre, heart disease is the leading cause of death among Canadian women. Every year, heart disease claims the lives of roughly 25,000 women. This is more than the five most prevalent cancers combined. Tri-Mach Group is proud to be part of the RED Day community and is thrilled in the increased RED Day investment for the St. Mary’s Regional Cardiac Care Centre.

Show your support today and wear RED for the heart of the women you love! #RedDayFriday

For more information on RED Day or to donate to this cause, go to: www.supportstmarys.akaraisin.com

Quebec Meat Companies Look to Expand

From: Food in Canada

Saint-Bruno-Lac-Saint-Jean, Que. – Two businesses in the agri-food sector in Quebec have received repayable loans to help them expand their operations.

In a statement, Canada Economic Development (CED) for Quebec Regions says the two businesses, Boucherie Charcuterie Perron Inc. and Charcuterie L. Fortin Ltée, will share $1,850,000.

That financial support, says CED, “will generate an estimated $6,569,768 in total investments in the Saguenay-Lac-Saint-Jean region.”

Boucherie Charcuterie Perron will receive $1,000,000, and Charcuterie L. Fortin will receive $850,000.

Both companies will use the assistance to “upgrade their equipment and facilities, shifting to Industry 4.0 by automating part of their production,” says the statement.

Boucherie Charcuterie produces hams, sausages, and specialty pork products, while Charcuterie L. Fortin produces deli meats, smoked ham, bacon and specialty pork products.

Both companies are also part of the Nutrinor cooperative and employ nearly 125 people from the region. Nutrinor has 936 farmer members and has a presence in food, agriculture, energy and hardware.

 

Maple Leaf Foods Revamps its Portfolio

From: Food in Canada

Mississauga, Ont. – One of Canada’s largest consumer protein companies is revamping its entire portfolio of products.

In a statement, Maple Leaf Foods says its aim is to meet “the changing needs of Canadian families.”

And in order to do that, the company is now ensuring that all of its products are made with premium meat and real, simple or natural ingredients.

All products will contain no artificial preservatives, flavours, colours or sweeteners. And the company adds that ingredient lists will contain only “pronounceable ingredients that consumers trust.”

The changes are all part of the company’s new Food Manifesto. To read the document, click here.

The products, which began rolling out in May, will have a new logo, packaging design and more prominent ingredient list. Maple Leaf says it will be using television, billboards, digital and print media to get the word out.

Adam Grogan, senior vice-president of Marketing and Innovation, says in the statement that “Over the last 18 months, Maple Leaf has reformulated each product carrying this brand, with just the simplest and highest quality real food.”

HyLife Foods Opening Ceremonies

April 4, 2018

HyLife Foods is now investing up to $176 million in an expansion of its main processing plant at Neepawa, Manitoba and new finishing barns. The company has hired over 100 new employees because of the expansion and currently already employs over 2000 people at their main facility.

President of HyLife Foods, Claude Vielfaure, suggests the expansion in Neepawa comes as a result of the growing demand for Canadian pork in Japan and China as well as in Canada. Tri-Mach was the successful contractor selected to design and install new processing and packaging conveyors along with the installation of all capital equipment and a new hog rail.

We are proud to be a partner of HyLife and congratulate them on a very successful project and future.

Visit www.hylife.com to learn more about their plans for the new expansion. 

Canada’s CFIA and USA’s FDA Have Signed a Memorandum of Understanding

From: Food in Canada

College Park, Md. – The Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) have agreed to collaborate.

The two agencies announced in a press release that they “have signed a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) that will facilitate the sharing of food safety information and data, and enable collaborative research projects.”

For a look at the MOU, click here.

Paul Mayers, vice-president of the Science Branch of the CFIA, says in the statement that the two countries already share a strong tie, which “allows us to work together to find innovative and cooperative ways to share information and data in respect to food safety. This collaborative approach to information sharing builds on our individual strengths while expanding our combined knowledge.”

The purpose of the MOU, which was signed at the FDA Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition campus, is to help both countries collaborate on food safety science.

The MOU is expected to give scientists on both sides of the border access to greater food safety information and data, which will bolster innovation and advance research.

Federal Government Invests in Canadian Livestock Health

From: Food in Canada

Guelph, Ont. – Canada’s federal government is supporting livestock health with an investment of $1.31 million.

In a statement, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada (AAFC) says the investment was made to the Canadian Animal Health Coalition (CAHC) “to help ensure the safe transportation of livestock, develop emergency management tools for the livestock industry and improve animal care assessments.”

Jennifer MacTavish, the chair of the CAHC, says in the statement that the organization appreciates the support. She adds that the funding will help “develop Canada’s Codes of Practice for the care and handling of farm animals and affiliated animal care assurance programs.”

The CAHC is a non-profit organization serving Canada’s farmed animal industry. The organization is a partnership of cross-sectorial organizations, all recognizing a shared responsibility for an effective animal health system.

The investment will be divided between four projects, as noted in the statement, including:

  • Up to $223,929 to develop a new livestock transport on-line certification program that will simplify, standardize and provide an opportunity for truckers, shippers and receivers to more easily access the training necessary to improve handling practices.
  • Up to $160,713 to update the Transportation Codes of Practice for the care and handling of farm animals during transport.
  • Up to $813,200 to develop an emergency management plan for the Canadian livestock industry to help mitigate, to respond to, and to recover from major hazard emergencies.
  • Up to $112,180 to revise the Chicken Farmers of Canada’s animal care assessment program to meet the new Code of Practice for hatching eggs, breeders, chickens and turkeys. The project will strengthen the poultry industry’s capacity to respond to ever increasing demand by markets to demonstrate effective animal care standards.

Ontario’s Supports Conestoga Meat Packers

From: Food in Canada

Breslau, Ont. – Conestoga Meat Packers has received a financial boost from the province of Ontario. In a statement, the Ministry of Agriculture, Food and Rural Affairs announced that it is investing $5.3 million to help the company “boost productivity and expand its pork processing capacity by 86 per cent.” The investment is expected to create 170 new jobs at the facility in Breslau.

“Our government is proud to support the continued growth of Ontario’s food processing sector, an important driver of our economy,” said Jeff Leal, Ontario’s minister of Agriculture, in the statement. “This support will help Conestoga Meat Packers increase its productivity, enhance competitiveness and create good jobs in Waterloo Region.” Conestoga Meat began processing farm-fresh pork in 1982. Today it is Ontario’s second-largest pork processor and is a wholly owned subsidiary of Progressive Pork Producers Co-operative Inc., a co-op of 157 southwestern Ontario hog producers. The government investment was made through Ontario’s Jobs and Prosperity Fund. With the funding Conestoga Meat “will purchase leading-edge equipment that will almost double its meat processing capacity.”

For more information on the Conestoga Meat Packers, check out their website: www.conestogameats.com

Building the Ontario Beef Brand 

From: BLOCKtalk Magazine 

According to BLOCKtalk Magazine, “2017 will mark an exciting year for the Beef Farmers of Ontario (BFO) as the organization makes a significant shift in the role they play in the development and implementation of regional marketing initiatives throughout Ontario”. BLOCKtalk discusses the strong demand for Ontario beef in the consumer market and how we must bridge the gap between farmers, processors and urban customers when paying for local beef products. 

Click here to learn more about the BFO and how they are reaching out to their consumers. 

 

 

 

No animal required, but would people eat artificial meat?

From: FoodProcessing.com

Futurists tell us that we will be eating in vitro meat (IVM) – meat grown in a laboratory rather than on a farm – within five to 10 years.

IVM was first investigated in the early years of this century and since then, criticisms of farm animal product systems, particularly intensive ones, have escalated. 

They include the excessive use of land, energy and water resources; local and global pollution; poor animal welfare; a contribution to climate change; and unhealthy eating habits and disease in humans.

At the same time, human (and livestock) population growth continues, farming land is requisitioned for urban expansion and meat consumption per person is rising.

So we want a new source of meat – or do we?

Reaction to artificial meat

Growing meat artificially, under laboratory-type conditions, is not possible on a large scale. But people’s concerns about eating IVM have rarely been explored.

In a recent survey, published this month in PLOS One, we investigated the views of people in the United States, a country with one of the largest appetites for meat and an equally large appetite for adopting new technologies.

A total of 673 people responded to the survey, done online via Amazon Mechanical Turk, in which they were given information about IVM and asked questions about their attitudes to it.

Although most people (65%), and particularly males, were willing to try IVM, only about a third said they would use it regularly or as a replacement for farmed meat.

But many people were undecided: 26 per cent were unsure if they would use it as a replacement for farmed meat and 31 per cent unsure if they would eat it regularly. This suggests there is scope to persuade consumers that they should convert to IVM if a suitable product is available. As an indication of this potential, 53 per cent said it was seen as preferable to soy substitutes.

The pros and cons of IVM

The biggest concerns were about IVM’s taste and lack of appeal, particularly in the case of meats seen as healthy, such as fish and chicken, where only two-thirds of people that normally at them said that they would if it was produced by in vitro methods.

In contrast, 72 per cent of people who normally eat beef and pig products would still do so if they were produced as IVM. Interestingly, about 4 per cent of people said they would try IVM products of horse, dog or cat – despite these being meats they would not currently eat.

The perceived advantages of IVM were that it was environmentally and animal-welfare friendly, ethical, and less likely to carry diseases. It could increase the proportion of happy animals on Earth if it replaced intensive farm animal production. By happy, we mean well nourished, comfortable, healthy, free from pain, and able to perform.

The disadvantages were that IVM was perceived as unnatural, potentially less tasty and likely to have a negative impact on farmers, by putting them out of business.

The IVM consumer

So who would be most likely to use IVM, and hence dictate the focus of advertisers’ pitch?

Gender was the biggest predicting factor with men more likely on average to say they would try IVM, whereas women were less sure. Men also had more positive views of its benefits.

Recognizing that meat-eating men are often viewed as more masculine, it is not clear whether this prevailing attitude would change if men converted to eating IVM.

Those with liberal political views rather than conservative ones were also much more receptive to the idea, confirming their more progressive viewpoints generally, as well as their traditionally stronger focus on fairness and avoiding harm to others.

Vegetarians and vegans were more likely to support the benefits of IVM but least likely to try it. People who ate little meat were also more supportive, compared with big meat eaters.

IVM on the menu

While a reasonably large proportion of the sample reported willingness to try IVM in the future, there appears to be hesitation around the idea of incorporating it into a daily diet.

Resistance came primarily from practical concerns, such as taste and price. But these are factors that are largely under the control of the manufacturers.

The concerns – about taste, price and impact on farmers – could all be effectively dealt with if there was sufficient financial advantage in producing IVM.

As tissue engineering techniques improve, culturing meat in vitro also brings the opportunity to introduce health-promoting ingredients, such as polyunsaturated fats, more easily than in living animals.

Another commonly cited concern was the perception that the product was unnatural. This may be similar to people’s concerns about genetically-modified (GM) foods – some of those who oppose GM foods are moral absolutists who would not be influenced by any argument in favour.

By expressing concern about the naturalness of IVM, some people were suggesting that there are fundamental issues that would cause them to reject it.

But with a little investigation into the processing and production of some meat products today, they might soften their attitudes toward IVM.

If IVM doesn’t take your fancy, lab-grown leather is actively being developed by a company that was dissuaded from producing IVM because it thought only 40 per cent of people would even try it.

That was back in 2012 and now our survey has found that 65 per cent of people surveyed in the U.S. said they would definitely or probably try IVM. So maybe people are becoming more responsive to the idea as opposition to conventional animal farming grows.

Although ours was a relatively small survey in a developed country (with a huge appetite for meat), one can speculate that people in developing countries might be less concerned about issues like taste and natural appeal of IVM. They might view it as a valuable source of protein they would not otherwise get.

Perhaps the futurists are right and IVM will be what fills our dinner plates in the near future.