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Premium Brands acquires Ontario protein manufacturer

From: Food in Canada

Vancouver – Premium Brands Holdings Corporation has added a new protein solutions company to its family.

Premium Brands has acquired a 100 per cent interest in Concord Premium Meats, an Ontario company that manufactures products under the MarcAngelo, Skoulakis, Central Park Deli, Black River Angus and Connie’s Kitchen brands.

Premium Brands owns a range of specialty food manufacturing and food distribution businesses with operations in BC, Alberta, Saskatchewan, Manitoba, Ontario, Quebec, Nova Scotia and locations in the U.S.

George Paleologou, president and CEO of Premium Brands, says in a statement that the culture at Concord Premium Meats fits in well at Premium Brands and the company’s “focus on products that are benefitting from a variety of long-term consumer trends, combined with its product innovation abilities and production capacities will help to further accelerate the growth of our Protein Group.”

Tri-Mach Goes RED

June 8, 2018

Today, Tri-Mach Group wears RED to show support and participate in RED Day.

What is RED Day?

St. Mary’s Red DAY fundraiser is an opportunity to come together as a community to raise awareness of heart disease as a serious health risk and how it can be prevented. According to the Regional Cardiac Centre, heart disease is the leading cause of death among Canadian women. Every year, heart disease claims the lives of roughly 25,000 women. This is more than the five most prevalent cancers combined. Tri-Mach Group is proud to be part of the RED Day community and is thrilled in the increased RED Day investment for the St. Mary’s Regional Cardiac Care Centre.

Show your support today and wear RED for the heart of the women you love! #RedDayFriday

For more information on RED Day or to donate to this cause, go to: www.supportstmarys.akaraisin.com

Whole Grains Contribute Significant Nutrients to Canadians’ Diets

From: Food in Canada

Saskatoon, Sask. – Canadians may not all be consuming enough whole grains, but a survey has found that what whole grain foods they do consume are nutrient dense.

This observation is one of the findings the University of Saskatchewan presented at the Canadian Nutrition Society’s annual conference in Nova Scotia.

An article on the university’s website about the findings (“Cutting out grains cut out important nutrient sources” on May 7, 2018 by Jennifer Thoma) explains that a team at the U of S examined grain consumption patterns in the recently released 2015 Canadian Community Health Survey by Statistics Canada.

What the research team found was “that many foods made from enriched (refined grains) grains or whole grains are important nutrient contributors to the Canadian diet.”

In fact, the current consumption of whole grains among Canadian consumers delivers “a high amount of key nutrients to the diet (43 per cent of folate, 39 per cent of iron and 31 per cent of dietary fibre) while only contributing 25 per cent of the daily calories,” says the article.

But what the team also found was that about 80 per cent of Canadian adults are not consuming the amount of whole or enriched grains that Canada’s Food Guide recommends they should.

One of the researchers says most of the grains we consume are enriched. And since enriched grains can contribute “23 per cent of Canadians’ daily fibre, 40 per cent of folate and 31 per cent of the iron” they are still an “important food source.”

For more on the research, click here.